Based upon the book, Colum wrote the lyrics for Clannad 's song "TransAtlantic", released with the album Nádúr in September 2013. He also wrote the liner notes for the album.

It tells the intertwined stories of Alcock and Brown (the first non-stop transatlantic fliers in 1919), the visit of Frederick Douglass to Ireland in 1845/46, and the story of the Irish peace process as negotiated by Senator George Mitchell in 1998. The book fuses these stories with fictional narratives of women spanning the course of two centuries.

Reviews for the book have been generally positive. Theo Talt in The Guardian commended McCann's skill as a writer though expressed concern at the plot becoming unwieldy in light of the many themes and story strands present in the novel. [1] The Daily Express also commented favourably on the novel, in particular the novel's "lyrical and emotional power". [2]

Based upon the book, Colum wrote the lyrics for Clannad 's song "TransAtlantic", released with the album Nádúr in September 2013. He also wrote the liner notes for the album.

It tells the intertwined stories of Alcock and Brown (the first non-stop transatlantic fliers in 1919), the visit of Frederick Douglass to Ireland in 1845/46, and the story of the Irish peace process as negotiated by Senator George Mitchell in 1998. The book fuses these stories with fictional narratives of women spanning the course of two centuries.

Reviews for the book have been generally positive. Theo Talt in The Guardian commended McCann's skill as a writer though expressed concern at the plot becoming unwieldy in light of the many themes and story strands present in the novel. [1] The Daily Express also commented favourably on the novel, in particular the novel's "lyrical and emotional power". [2]

Off the coast of Brazil, a team of scientists discovers a horror like no other, an island where all life has been eradicated, consumed and possessed by a species beyond imagination. Before they can report their discovery, a mysterious agency attacks the group, killing them all, save one, an entomologist, an expert on venomous creatures, Professor Ken Matsui from Cornell University.

Strangest of all, this inexplicable threat traces back to a terrifying secret buried a century ago beneath the National Mall: a cache of bones preserved in amber. The artifact was hidden away by a cabal of scientists—led by Alexander Graham Bell—to protect humankind. But they dared not destroy it, for the object also holds an astonishing promise for the future: the very secret of life after death .

Yet, nothing stays buried forever. An ancient horror—dormant in the marrow of those preserved bones—is free once more, nursed and developed into a weapon of incalculable strength and malignancy, ready to wreak havoc on an unsuspecting world.

Alison Acheson’s eighth book, 19 Things: A Book Of Lists for Me , will be published in Fall 2014. Her works are for all ages, from picture books to short fiction for adults. Her novel, Mud Girl , was a Canadian Library Association finalist for Young Adult Book of the Year, and Grandpa’s Music is on the IBBY List of Books for Children Living With Disabilities. She lives and works in Ladner, in a houseful of boys, and is currently at work on a middle-grade mystery novel set in one of the nearby floathome communities on the Fraser River. She teaches Writing For Children and Young Adults in the MFA program at the University of British Columbia.

Mariama Ahmed is a writer and freelance content marketer based in Toronto, Ontario. Her writings and interviews have been featured on CBC’s Fresh Air and Life Rattle Press.

When she’s not writing she attends Al Hikmah Islamic Centre for their full time program on the study of the Qur’an. She also co-host of The Woman Up Podcast, an open discussion with women of all walks of life from almost every continent as they journey into self betterment, one conversation at a time.

Based upon the book, Colum wrote the lyrics for Clannad 's song "TransAtlantic", released with the album Nádúr in September 2013. He also wrote the liner notes for the album.

It tells the intertwined stories of Alcock and Brown (the first non-stop transatlantic fliers in 1919), the visit of Frederick Douglass to Ireland in 1845/46, and the story of the Irish peace process as negotiated by Senator George Mitchell in 1998. The book fuses these stories with fictional narratives of women spanning the course of two centuries.

Reviews for the book have been generally positive. Theo Talt in The Guardian commended McCann's skill as a writer though expressed concern at the plot becoming unwieldy in light of the many themes and story strands present in the novel. [1] The Daily Express also commented favourably on the novel, in particular the novel's "lyrical and emotional power". [2]

Off the coast of Brazil, a team of scientists discovers a horror like no other, an island where all life has been eradicated, consumed and possessed by a species beyond imagination. Before they can report their discovery, a mysterious agency attacks the group, killing them all, save one, an entomologist, an expert on venomous creatures, Professor Ken Matsui from Cornell University.

Strangest of all, this inexplicable threat traces back to a terrifying secret buried a century ago beneath the National Mall: a cache of bones preserved in amber. The artifact was hidden away by a cabal of scientists—led by Alexander Graham Bell—to protect humankind. But they dared not destroy it, for the object also holds an astonishing promise for the future: the very secret of life after death .

Yet, nothing stays buried forever. An ancient horror—dormant in the marrow of those preserved bones—is free once more, nursed and developed into a weapon of incalculable strength and malignancy, ready to wreak havoc on an unsuspecting world.

Transatlantic | Define Transatlantic at Dictionary.com


‘TransAtlantic,’ by Colum McCann - The New York Times

Posted by 2018 article

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