The Chimaera of Arezzo traces the myth of Bellerophon and the Chimaera—the legendary fire-breathing monster comprised of a lion, a goat, and a serpent—over five centuries of classical art. It features the magnificent Chimaera of Arezzo, a large-scale Etruscan bronze statue on loan from the National Archaeological Museum in Florence. With a selection of pottery, coins, gems, and other objects, the exhibition explores the life and afterlife of an Etruscan icon.

Explore the themes of the exhibition:

Mythology | Iconography | Religion | Discovery | Afterlife

Bellerophon's victory over the Chimaera was represented in ancient Italian art more than any other heroic exploit.

This vessel has one of the earliest known representations of a Chimaera. Brandishing a spear, a helmeted warrior stalks a composite beast with a curly pelt and a protruding tongue.

Because Pegasus is absent, it is unclear whether this is an illustration of the Bellerophon myth or a generic scene of hunting exotic and imaginary beasts. The lion (at center) and the sphinx (at left)—a hybrid creature with an animal body, wings, and a human head—would have been equally foreign to the Faliscan makers of this vessel.

Etruscan artists regularly reworked the myth of Bellerophon and the Chimaera, infusing the Greek narrative with local understandings of the Chimaera's essential nature. In Etruscan culture, monsters were associated with the cycle of life, death, and rebirth, and were sometimes depicted as nurturing mothers.

Here a maternal Chimaera suckles a baby feline that has yet to sprout its additional animal heads. What sort of creature will her cub grow up to be? A likely destiny is illustrated on the reverse side of this vase: a fierce male Chimaera is shown with two appendages, a goat and a snake-tipped tail, both of which belch fire.

The Chimaera was a hybrid monster in Greek mythology, child of Typhoeus and Echidna and sibling of Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra . It had the head and body of a lion, as well as the head of a goat that was attached to its back, and a tail that ended on a head of a snake.

It resided in Lycia , a place in Asia Minor, where it ravaged the lands with its fire breath. It was killed by Bellerophon , assisted by Pegasus , when the former was asked by King Iobates of Lycia . Bellerophon rode on Pegasus ' back, who could fly, and shot arrows at the Chimera from above.

The Chimaera of Arezzo traces the myth of Bellerophon and the Chimaera—the legendary fire-breathing monster comprised of a lion, a goat, and a serpent—over five centuries of classical art. It features the magnificent Chimaera of Arezzo, a large-scale Etruscan bronze statue on loan from the National Archaeological Museum in Florence. With a selection of pottery, coins, gems, and other objects, the exhibition explores the life and afterlife of an Etruscan icon.

Explore the themes of the exhibition:

Mythology | Iconography | Religion | Discovery | Afterlife

Bellerophon's victory over the Chimaera was represented in ancient Italian art more than any other heroic exploit.

This vessel has one of the earliest known representations of a Chimaera. Brandishing a spear, a helmeted warrior stalks a composite beast with a curly pelt and a protruding tongue.

Because Pegasus is absent, it is unclear whether this is an illustration of the Bellerophon myth or a generic scene of hunting exotic and imaginary beasts. The lion (at center) and the sphinx (at left)—a hybrid creature with an animal body, wings, and a human head—would have been equally foreign to the Faliscan makers of this vessel.

Etruscan artists regularly reworked the myth of Bellerophon and the Chimaera, infusing the Greek narrative with local understandings of the Chimaera's essential nature. In Etruscan culture, monsters were associated with the cycle of life, death, and rebirth, and were sometimes depicted as nurturing mothers.

Here a maternal Chimaera suckles a baby feline that has yet to sprout its additional animal heads. What sort of creature will her cub grow up to be? A likely destiny is illustrated on the reverse side of this vase: a fierce male Chimaera is shown with two appendages, a goat and a snake-tipped tail, both of which belch fire.

The Chimaera was a hybrid monster in Greek mythology, child of Typhoeus and Echidna and sibling of Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra . It had the head and body of a lion, as well as the head of a goat that was attached to its back, and a tail that ended on a head of a snake.

It resided in Lycia , a place in Asia Minor, where it ravaged the lands with its fire breath. It was killed by Bellerophon , assisted by Pegasus , when the former was asked by King Iobates of Lycia . Bellerophon rode on Pegasus ' back, who could fly, and shot arrows at the Chimera from above.

The Greek civilization was one of the most influential in the history of the world. They gave us democracy, mathematics, philosophy, and of course, their crazy mythology that has been portrayed in films such as Clash of the Titans , Heracles , and Percy Jackson and the Olympians . Many people relate to the Greek gods because of their surprisingly human behaviour.

The twelve Titans were the group of gods immediately preceding the Olympian gods in Greek mythology. The Olympians defeated the Titans in a battle and took control of the world.

As Lord of the Underworld, Hades gets treated as the Greek equivalent of the devil. But, in actuality, he got the job because he and his brothers drew straws and he got stuck with the underworld. Seriously, the story goes Hades drew lots with his brothers, Zeus and Poseidon, to decide which part of the world each would rule. Zeus received the sky, Poseidon the seas, and Hades the underworld.

The Chimaera of Arezzo traces the myth of Bellerophon and the Chimaera—the legendary fire-breathing monster comprised of a lion, a goat, and a serpent—over five centuries of classical art. It features the magnificent Chimaera of Arezzo, a large-scale Etruscan bronze statue on loan from the National Archaeological Museum in Florence. With a selection of pottery, coins, gems, and other objects, the exhibition explores the life and afterlife of an Etruscan icon.

Explore the themes of the exhibition:

Mythology | Iconography | Religion | Discovery | Afterlife

Bellerophon's victory over the Chimaera was represented in ancient Italian art more than any other heroic exploit.

This vessel has one of the earliest known representations of a Chimaera. Brandishing a spear, a helmeted warrior stalks a composite beast with a curly pelt and a protruding tongue.

Because Pegasus is absent, it is unclear whether this is an illustration of the Bellerophon myth or a generic scene of hunting exotic and imaginary beasts. The lion (at center) and the sphinx (at left)—a hybrid creature with an animal body, wings, and a human head—would have been equally foreign to the Faliscan makers of this vessel.

Etruscan artists regularly reworked the myth of Bellerophon and the Chimaera, infusing the Greek narrative with local understandings of the Chimaera's essential nature. In Etruscan culture, monsters were associated with the cycle of life, death, and rebirth, and were sometimes depicted as nurturing mothers.

Here a maternal Chimaera suckles a baby feline that has yet to sprout its additional animal heads. What sort of creature will her cub grow up to be? A likely destiny is illustrated on the reverse side of this vase: a fierce male Chimaera is shown with two appendages, a goat and a snake-tipped tail, both of which belch fire.

Chimera | Greek mythology | Britannica.com


Chimera (mythology) - Wikipedia

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