Bellerophon ( / b ə ˈ l ɛr ə f ən / ; Greek : Βελλεροφῶν ) or Bellerophontes ( Βελλεροφόντης ) is a hero of Greek mythology . He was "the greatest hero and slayer of monsters, alongside Cadmus and Perseus , before the days of Heracles ", [1] and his greatest feat was killing the Chimera , a monster that Homer depicted with a lion's head, a goat's body, and a serpent's tail: "her breath came out in terrible blasts of burning flame." [2] Bellerophon was born at Corinth and was the son of the mortal Eurynome by either her husband Glaucus , or Poseidon .

One possible etymology that has been suggested is: Βελλεροφόντης from βέλεμνον, βελόνη, βέλος ("projectile, dart, javelin, needle, arrow, bullet") and -φόντης ("slayer") from φονεύω ("to slay"). However, Geoffrey Kirk says that "Βελλεροφόντης means 'slayer of Belleros'". [3] Belleros could have been a Lycian, a local daimon or a Corinthian nobleman—Bellerophon's name "clearly invited all sorts of speculation". [3]

Enough fragments of Euripides ' lost tragedy, Bellerophontes , remain embedded as some thirty quotations in surviving texts to give scholars a basis for assessing its theme: the tragic outcome of his attempt to storm Olympus on Pegasus. An outspoken passage—in which Bellerophon seems to doubt the gods' existence from the contrast between the wicked and impious, who live lives of ease, with the privations suffered by the good—is apparently the basis for Aristophanes ' imputation of " atheism " to the poet. [24]

Bellerophon ( / b ə ˈ l ɛr ə f ən / ; Greek : Βελλεροφῶν ) or Bellerophontes ( Βελλεροφόντης ) is a hero of Greek mythology . He was "the greatest hero and slayer of monsters, alongside Cadmus and Perseus , before the days of Heracles ", [1] and his greatest feat was killing the Chimera , a monster that Homer depicted with a lion's head, a goat's body, and a serpent's tail: "her breath came out in terrible blasts of burning flame." [2] Bellerophon was born at Corinth and was the son of the mortal Eurynome by either her husband Glaucus , or Poseidon .

One possible etymology that has been suggested is: Βελλεροφόντης from βέλεμνον, βελόνη, βέλος ("projectile, dart, javelin, needle, arrow, bullet") and -φόντης ("slayer") from φονεύω ("to slay"). However, Geoffrey Kirk says that "Βελλεροφόντης means 'slayer of Belleros'". [3] Belleros could have been a Lycian, a local daimon or a Corinthian nobleman—Bellerophon's name "clearly invited all sorts of speculation". [3]

Enough fragments of Euripides ' lost tragedy, Bellerophontes , remain embedded as some thirty quotations in surviving texts to give scholars a basis for assessing its theme: the tragic outcome of his attempt to storm Olympus on Pegasus. An outspoken passage—in which Bellerophon seems to doubt the gods' existence from the contrast between the wicked and impious, who live lives of ease, with the privations suffered by the good—is apparently the basis for Aristophanes ' imputation of " atheism " to the poet. [24]

The Chimaera was a hybrid monster in Greek mythology, child of Typhoeus and Echidna and sibling of Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra . It had the head and body of a lion, as well as the head of a goat that was attached to its back, and a tail that ended on a head of a snake.

It resided in Lycia , a place in Asia Minor, where it ravaged the lands with its fire breath. It was killed by Bellerophon , assisted by Pegasus , when the former was asked by King Iobates of Lycia . Bellerophon rode on Pegasus ' back, who could fly, and shot arrows at the Chimera from above.

Chimera | Greek mythology | Britannica.com


Chimaera - Greek Mythology

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