In Greek mythology , the Chimera is a monstrous creature that was composed of several different animals. The chimera is only one of several famous mythological hybrids. As with all mythical creatures , there is the question of its origin. In some traditions, the Chimera was one of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna and sister of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra. However, the chimera does not appear to have an existence in physical reality, save for the individual animals from which it is composed.

The word chimera comes from the Greek Χίμαιρα, which translates as "she-goat or monster." [1] Through the Latin Chimaera comes the English version, which has a second definition, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, as being "An unreal creature of the imagination, a mere fancy; an un-found conception." Along with these two meanings are a host of variants on the root word: Chimeric is something that is "fanciful or imaginary"; Chimerical is something "of the nature of the chimera; vainly or fantastically conceived"; and Chimerize is the act of indulging "in chimeras, indulge and foster wild and unfounded fancies."

The most common description of the chimera comes from Homer 's Illiad, in which the creature is said to have the head of a lion , the body of a goat , and tail of a snake . It is also believed to breath fire and be female, despite the mane adorning the lions head. [2] The chimera was said to be incredibly vicious and powerful, especially since as one single creature, it possessed the abilities of three separate animals.

The Chimera, in mythology, is a Greek monster with the body and head of a lion with a snake for a tail and a fire-breathing goat head coming from its back.  Different versions of Chimera mythology have slightly different descriptions, such as wings on the back or the back legs of a snake, but most follow the description above.

No matter how you describe it, the Chimera is the daughter of Greek monster gods Typhon and Echidna , which means its siblings include other famous Greek monsters such as The Sphinx, Cerberus , and Ladon.

Merely seeing the Chimera was a bad omen.  The Greek monster regularly appeared before disasters such as shipwrecks, violent storms, and volcanic eruptions.

The most famous moment involving the Chimera in Greek mythology is when the Greek hero Bellerophon, with the help of his trusty winged steed, Pegasus, killed the Chimera with a bow and arrow from the sky above.

In Greek mythology , the Chimera is a monstrous creature that was composed of several different animals. The chimera is only one of several famous mythological hybrids. As with all mythical creatures , there is the question of its origin. In some traditions, the Chimera was one of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna and sister of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra. However, the chimera does not appear to have an existence in physical reality, save for the individual animals from which it is composed.

The word chimera comes from the Greek Χίμαιρα, which translates as "she-goat or monster." [1] Through the Latin Chimaera comes the English version, which has a second definition, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, as being "An unreal creature of the imagination, a mere fancy; an un-found conception." Along with these two meanings are a host of variants on the root word: Chimeric is something that is "fanciful or imaginary"; Chimerical is something "of the nature of the chimera; vainly or fantastically conceived"; and Chimerize is the act of indulging "in chimeras, indulge and foster wild and unfounded fancies."

The most common description of the chimera comes from Homer 's Illiad, in which the creature is said to have the head of a lion , the body of a goat , and tail of a snake . It is also believed to breath fire and be female, despite the mane adorning the lions head. [2] The chimera was said to be incredibly vicious and powerful, especially since as one single creature, it possessed the abilities of three separate animals.

The Chimera, in mythology, is a Greek monster with the body and head of a lion with a snake for a tail and a fire-breathing goat head coming from its back.  Different versions of Chimera mythology have slightly different descriptions, such as wings on the back or the back legs of a snake, but most follow the description above.

No matter how you describe it, the Chimera is the daughter of Greek monster gods Typhon and Echidna , which means its siblings include other famous Greek monsters such as The Sphinx, Cerberus , and Ladon.

Merely seeing the Chimera was a bad omen.  The Greek monster regularly appeared before disasters such as shipwrecks, violent storms, and volcanic eruptions.

The most famous moment involving the Chimera in Greek mythology is when the Greek hero Bellerophon, with the help of his trusty winged steed, Pegasus, killed the Chimera with a bow and arrow from the sky above.

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In Greek mythology , the Chimera is a monstrous creature that was composed of several different animals. The chimera is only one of several famous mythological hybrids. As with all mythical creatures , there is the question of its origin. In some traditions, the Chimera was one of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna and sister of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra. However, the chimera does not appear to have an existence in physical reality, save for the individual animals from which it is composed.

The word chimera comes from the Greek Χίμαιρα, which translates as "she-goat or monster." [1] Through the Latin Chimaera comes the English version, which has a second definition, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, as being "An unreal creature of the imagination, a mere fancy; an un-found conception." Along with these two meanings are a host of variants on the root word: Chimeric is something that is "fanciful or imaginary"; Chimerical is something "of the nature of the chimera; vainly or fantastically conceived"; and Chimerize is the act of indulging "in chimeras, indulge and foster wild and unfounded fancies."

The most common description of the chimera comes from Homer 's Illiad, in which the creature is said to have the head of a lion , the body of a goat , and tail of a snake . It is also believed to breath fire and be female, despite the mane adorning the lions head. [2] The chimera was said to be incredibly vicious and powerful, especially since as one single creature, it possessed the abilities of three separate animals.

Chimera Mythology - The Hybrid Monster - Gods And Monsters


Chimaera - Greek Mythology

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