Because every Fall scores and scores of you can’t get on my calendar in time for your job deadlines or are living on a grad student or adjunct budget that won’t allow for my in-person editing rates.  You want and need help on your cover letter that goes deeper than the blog and the book, is more individualized than the webinar recordings, but costs less than individual editing.

Once you purchase the online course, you get immediate access to a 10-module program that walks you through each element of the cover letter, from the salutation to the sign-off, with assigned readings in my book The Professor Is In: The Essential Guide to Turning Your Ph.D. Into a Job (which you must purchase to do the program) and on the blog.

Each module includes worksheets that lead you from the mental process of recognizing the content from your record that “counts,” through the challenge of condensing that content into effective, concise, fact-based language, and finally to the work of refining it into memorable paragraphs that frame your expertise in ways that work for the job market.

Thus begins a 1965 letter from comedian Joan Rivers to future New York Times theater critic Mel Gussow. In the letter, now in Gussow's archive at the Harry Ransom Center , Rivers thanks Gussow profusely for publishing an article about her at such a formative point in her career.

All too aware of what she can possibly say, Rivers closes the letter: "To say 'thank you very, very much' sounds so trite but I really mean it I'm floating on air." Then, when words don't suffice, Rivers lets a picture take over: a hand-drawn stick figure of herself floating on air, beaming atop a cloud.

A staple of most collections, correspondence can speak volumes about the letter writer, and illustrated letters can be particularly revealing. From idiosyncratic letterheads to sketches, stamps, cartoons and multiple choice form letters, what do a letter's illustrations reveal?

Because every Fall scores and scores of you can’t get on my calendar in time for your job deadlines or are living on a grad student or adjunct budget that won’t allow for my in-person editing rates.  You want and need help on your cover letter that goes deeper than the blog and the book, is more individualized than the webinar recordings, but costs less than individual editing.

Once you purchase the online course, you get immediate access to a 10-module program that walks you through each element of the cover letter, from the salutation to the sign-off, with assigned readings in my book The Professor Is In: The Essential Guide to Turning Your Ph.D. Into a Job (which you must purchase to do the program) and on the blog.

Each module includes worksheets that lead you from the mental process of recognizing the content from your record that “counts,” through the challenge of condensing that content into effective, concise, fact-based language, and finally to the work of refining it into memorable paragraphs that frame your expertise in ways that work for the job market.

Because every Fall scores and scores of you can’t get on my calendar in time for your job deadlines or are living on a grad student or adjunct budget that won’t allow for my in-person editing rates.  You want and need help on your cover letter that goes deeper than the blog and the book, is more individualized than the webinar recordings, but costs less than individual editing.

Once you purchase the online course, you get immediate access to a 10-module program that walks you through each element of the cover letter, from the salutation to the sign-off, with assigned readings in my book The Professor Is In: The Essential Guide to Turning Your Ph.D. Into a Job (which you must purchase to do the program) and on the blog.

Each module includes worksheets that lead you from the mental process of recognizing the content from your record that “counts,” through the challenge of condensing that content into effective, concise, fact-based language, and finally to the work of refining it into memorable paragraphs that frame your expertise in ways that work for the job market.

Thus begins a 1965 letter from comedian Joan Rivers to future New York Times theater critic Mel Gussow. In the letter, now in Gussow's archive at the Harry Ransom Center , Rivers thanks Gussow profusely for publishing an article about her at such a formative point in her career.

All too aware of what she can possibly say, Rivers closes the letter: "To say 'thank you very, very much' sounds so trite but I really mean it I'm floating on air." Then, when words don't suffice, Rivers lets a picture take over: a hand-drawn stick figure of herself floating on air, beaming atop a cloud.

A staple of most collections, correspondence can speak volumes about the letter writer, and illustrated letters can be particularly revealing. From idiosyncratic letterheads to sketches, stamps, cartoons and multiple choice form letters, what do a letter's illustrations reveal?

Over recent years, letter writing has been replaced by other ways of communicating. Technology has developed so rapidly that we now expect to be able to talk to people instantly - and get a response from them almost straight away. Rather than putting pen to paper, for most of us it now feels much more natural to send texts and emails, quickly typing out our message within seconds.

Of course, there are advantages to these modern ways of communicating. We live in a fast-paced world and it’s important we keep up. We can chat to people all over the globe, within seconds! We can also edit our emails before we send them, whereas if we made a mistake on a letter, we’d be forced to cross it out or start again.

But do we ever think about what we are losing? By forgetting about the art of letter writing, I think we’re missing out. Hugely.

Main Home - The Painters Keys


Free Emoticon Signature Words - Glitter Graphics!

Posted by 2018 article

4156RhrASpL