The impetus for the initiation of the project was Kevin Begos Jr., a publisher of museum-quality manuscripts motivated by disregard for the commercialism of the art world, [4] who suggested to abstract painter Dennis Ashbaugh that they "put out an art book on computer that vanishes". [5] Ashbaugh—who despite his "heavy art-world resume" was bored with the abstract impressionist paintings he was doing—took the suggestion seriously, and developed it further. [5] [6]

A few years beforehand, Ashbaugh had written a fan letter to cyberpunk novelist William Gibson , whose oeuvre he had admired, and the pair had struck up a telephone friendship. [5] [6] Shortly after the project had germinated in the minds of Begos and Ashbaugh, they contacted and recruited Gibson. [2] The project exemplified Gibson's deep ambivalence towards technologically advanced futurity, and as The New York Times expressed it, was "designed to challenge conventional notions about books and art while extracting money from collectors of both". [2]

Some people have said that they think this is a scam or pure hype … [m]aybe fun, maybe interesting, but still a scam. But Gibson thinks of it as becoming a memory, which he believes is more real than anything you can actually see.

Hire CODAworx to run your artist selection process, use the RFP Toolkit, or tap into our referral services. Post an RFP/RFQ.

Highlight your expertise with projects that are viewed by commissioners and collaborators.

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The impetus for the initiation of the project was Kevin Begos Jr., a publisher of museum-quality manuscripts motivated by disregard for the commercialism of the art world, [4] who suggested to abstract painter Dennis Ashbaugh that they "put out an art book on computer that vanishes". [5] Ashbaugh—who despite his "heavy art-world resume" was bored with the abstract impressionist paintings he was doing—took the suggestion seriously, and developed it further. [5] [6]

A few years beforehand, Ashbaugh had written a fan letter to cyberpunk novelist William Gibson , whose oeuvre he had admired, and the pair had struck up a telephone friendship. [5] [6] Shortly after the project had germinated in the minds of Begos and Ashbaugh, they contacted and recruited Gibson. [2] The project exemplified Gibson's deep ambivalence towards technologically advanced futurity, and as The New York Times expressed it, was "designed to challenge conventional notions about books and art while extracting money from collectors of both". [2]

Some people have said that they think this is a scam or pure hype … [m]aybe fun, maybe interesting, but still a scam. But Gibson thinks of it as becoming a memory, which he believes is more real than anything you can actually see.

Hire CODAworx to run your artist selection process, use the RFP Toolkit, or tap into our referral services. Post an RFP/RFQ.

Highlight your expertise with projects that are viewed by commissioners and collaborators.

The impetus for the initiation of the project was Kevin Begos Jr., a publisher of museum-quality manuscripts motivated by disregard for the commercialism of the art world, [4] who suggested to abstract painter Dennis Ashbaugh that they "put out an art book on computer that vanishes". [5] Ashbaugh—who despite his "heavy art-world resume" was bored with the abstract impressionist paintings he was doing—took the suggestion seriously, and developed it further. [5] [6]

A few years beforehand, Ashbaugh had written a fan letter to cyberpunk novelist William Gibson , whose oeuvre he had admired, and the pair had struck up a telephone friendship. [5] [6] Shortly after the project had germinated in the minds of Begos and Ashbaugh, they contacted and recruited Gibson. [2] The project exemplified Gibson's deep ambivalence towards technologically advanced futurity, and as The New York Times expressed it, was "designed to challenge conventional notions about books and art while extracting money from collectors of both". [2]

Some people have said that they think this is a scam or pure hype … [m]aybe fun, maybe interesting, but still a scam. But Gibson thinks of it as becoming a memory, which he believes is more real than anything you can actually see.

Hire CODAworx to run your artist selection process, use the RFP Toolkit, or tap into our referral services. Post an RFP/RFQ.

Highlight your expertise with projects that are viewed by commissioners and collaborators.

Oops. A firewall is blocking access to Prezi content. Check out this article to learn more or contact your system administrator.

If you are sure that none of the above applies to you, and wish us to investigate the problem, we need to know your IP address. Go to this site , don't sign up, just copy the IP address (it looks like: 12.34.56.78 but your numbers will be different) and mail it to us . If that page also shows a proxy address, we need that one too.

The impetus for the initiation of the project was Kevin Begos Jr., a publisher of museum-quality manuscripts motivated by disregard for the commercialism of the art world, [4] who suggested to abstract painter Dennis Ashbaugh that they "put out an art book on computer that vanishes". [5] Ashbaugh—who despite his "heavy art-world resume" was bored with the abstract impressionist paintings he was doing—took the suggestion seriously, and developed it further. [5] [6]

A few years beforehand, Ashbaugh had written a fan letter to cyberpunk novelist William Gibson , whose oeuvre he had admired, and the pair had struck up a telephone friendship. [5] [6] Shortly after the project had germinated in the minds of Begos and Ashbaugh, they contacted and recruited Gibson. [2] The project exemplified Gibson's deep ambivalence towards technologically advanced futurity, and as The New York Times expressed it, was "designed to challenge conventional notions about books and art while extracting money from collectors of both". [2]

Some people have said that they think this is a scam or pure hype … [m]aybe fun, maybe interesting, but still a scam. But Gibson thinks of it as becoming a memory, which he believes is more real than anything you can actually see.

Favorite Poem Project


Poem-A-Day | Academy of American Poets

Posted by 2018 article

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