The rockers are there in studded leather jackets, proudly showing off their tattoos; so too are the snarling punks and less fashion-conscious, older commuters - with one middle-aged lady nursing a pint of beer as she sits in the carriage, back when the floors were still wooden.

Such were the scenes on the London Underground in the 1970s and 80s, beautifully captured on camera by Bob Mazzer, whose chronicle of life on the Tube was a happy accident.

Now aged 65, Mazzer, from Whitechapel in the East End, used to be a film projectionist in King's Cross - a job that saw him travelling home late at night.

The rockers are there in studded leather jackets, proudly showing off their tattoos; so too are the snarling punks and less fashion-conscious, older commuters - with one middle-aged lady nursing a pint of beer as she sits in the carriage, back when the floors were still wooden.

Such were the scenes on the London Underground in the 1970s and 80s, beautifully captured on camera by Bob Mazzer, whose chronicle of life on the Tube was a happy accident.

Now aged 65, Mazzer, from Whitechapel in the East End, used to be a film projectionist in King's Cross - a job that saw him travelling home late at night.

Life Underground (2001) is a permanent public artwork created by American sculptor Tom Otterness for the 14th Street – Eighth Avenue station ( A , ​ C , ​ E ​, and L trains) of the New York City Subway . It was commissioned by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority 's Arts for Transit program for US$ 200,000 — one percent of the station's reconstruction budget. [1] This program has commissioned more than 170 permanent works of art for public transportation facilities the MTA owns and operates. [2] This work is one of the most popular artworks in the subway system. [3]

An Underground Life: Memoirs of a Gay Jew in Nazi Berlin.


An Underground Life: Memoirs of a Gay Jew in Nazi Berlin.

Posted by 2018 article

41lTnLUMupL